Hypothyroidism; 9 natural ways to support an underactive thyroid

Hypothyroidism; 9 natural ways to support an underactive thyroid


– Hi, it’s Nicki here from
Happy Hormones for Life and today I’m talking about your thyroid, or hypothyroidism, in fact. Nine natural ways to support
an underactive thyroid. Now, hypothyroidism is exactly that, it’s hypo rather than hyperthyroidism. There are two forms. Hypo is low thyroid hormones, it’s when you have an
under active performing or low performing thyroid, or a low output of thyroid
hormones T3 and T4. Hyper thyroid is when you’ve got too much. And the symptoms are very different, but actually they can interchange when you have a certain
cause of a thyroid issue. Now, women are more at
risk, especially as we age and we go through other hormone imbalances like perimenopause or in
fact if we have gut issues or genetic susceptibility as well. So what are thyroid hormones? They are a bit like a
thermostat for our cells. So they either turn us up, so
they increase our metabolism, energy, temperature, alertness. Or they turn us down and they
slow down our metabolism, conserve our energy,
decrease our temperature, and pretty much shut down
non-essential functions. And all of that depends on
how much thyroid hormone we have available. So they travel to every single cell and that’s why common
symptoms are so wide ranging. I mean I could write pages of symptoms because low thyroid can
affect any part of your body because they’re traveling
to every single cell. So we do have some kind of key main symptoms for low thyroid. Fatigue, as in real exhaustion, especially first thing in the mornings. If you wake up feeling unrefreshed even if you’ve had a good nights sleep, that’s a common cause of low thyroid, it’s not the only one, but. Weight gain that you can’t shift because you’re metabolism is slow. Brain fog and memory loss,
and depression and anxiety are common with low thyroid because the energy’s just not
there for your brain cells. Cold, feeling cold, it’s
particularly your hands and feet. Dry skin, brittle nails,
PMS, anxiety, mood swings, puffy face, aching joints, low sex drive, constipation, high cholesterol, there’s a whole ton of symptoms that can be associated with low thyroid. Obviously there’s other
reasons too for those symptoms, but these are the common ones
that we need to look out for. And if you’ve ticked some of those, you really need to make sure you get your thyroid checked properly and I’ll talk about that in a second. So what are the causes of low thyroid, or underactive thyroid, hypothyroidism? The first one is Hashimoto’s disease. Now, Hashimoto’s disease
is the most common cause of an underactive thyroid. It’s probably around 70
to 80% of cases, in fact. And this is an autoimmune condition. It’s where your immune
system produces antibodies to your own thyroid gland, preventing it from functioning properly. Now, the only way of finding
out if you have this, is obviously test your thyroid antibodies. Not always a hundred percent reliable but it’s a good indication. The second big cause of low
thyroid is nutrient deficiency. So if it’s not an autoimmune condition, it’s in the other 20 or so percent, then it may be that you
have a nutrient deficiency because your thyroid hormones need a whole range of nutrients
to be able to work properly and convert themselves and be produced. And these include iodine,
tyrosine, selenium, copper, zinc, iron, essential fatty acids, and a whole host of vitamins. If you’re deficient in any of those, then your thyroid could be
struggling to work properly. The third reason is stress! Stress is always behind
something, isn’t it? Cortisol is your stress hormone, and it can be helpful or
harmful for your thyroid. Now, too much or too little cortisol resulting from lots of stress, can interfere with your
conversion of hormones. So we have the T4 that’s
produced from your thyroid gland needs to convert to T3 which
is your active hormone. And that conversion needs
a whole load of nutrients. It also relies on cortisol
being in the right range, so that is why stress has an impact. Fourthly, low progesterone
and high oestrogen. So your oestrogen, progesterone ratio, which we know can go
haywire during perimenopause and that can cause high levels of oestrogen compared to progesterone. And high levels of oestrogen can increase something called thyroid binding proteins and that decreases your level
of three thyroid hormones, which obviously decreases
the level of hormones that are available for the body to use. Now, progesterone’s also needed
for that conversion process. If you’re low in progesterone,
that can be affected as well. The fifth main cause
is food sensitivities. So one of the things that’s
most commonly associated with Hashimoto’s disease
is a gluten intolerance. It’s very interesting
the science is showing that it’s very much linked
to, and celiac disease, very much linked to Hashimoto’s. So you can then develop a leaky gut, and then that can then move on
to this autoimmune reaction. So that’s one thing. Number six cause of low
thyroid of course is aging. So as we age our hormone
production and function decreases, the metabolism slows down
as we lose muscle mass, and as we age our thyroid gets
pretty much less efficient, pretty much like the rest of us (laughs). It’s also affected by other
stuff going on in the body. And sometimes it’s a gradual process, the symptoms can kind of slowly get worse, but if you leave them untreated, you’re at more risk of serious conditions such as heart disease and diabetes. So we need to make sure that
we’re in balance the whole way. And the last cause of thyroid, and I think I’ve mentioned
it, is family history, so genetic factors can be
very influential in this. Now, I won’t go into testing,
I have another video on that, so I’ll link it underneath. But testing in the mainstream
is a bit hit and miss, so it’s really important
to get your whole pathway tested for thyroid because
often if you just test the mainstream hormones, it’s not going to show
a weakness further down. So if you have symptoms and
you’re being told you’re normal, then you may need to just
get some private tests done to really just check that
you are actually normal and you’re optimum because if
you’re still having symptoms, it’s suggesting that you’re
not actually optimal, but that you may be
normal down the bottom. If that makes sense. Nine natural ways to support your thyroid. Whether or not you need medication, there are lots of ways
to support your thyroid to improve your symptoms. So here are my top nine. So eat good quality protein. Protein breaks down to amino acids, one of which is tyrosine. You need tyrosine to
make thyroid hormones. And protein also helps to get
your hormones around the body, so we need that. Good sources, organic,
eggs, grass-fed meat, wild-caught fish, nuts and seeds, quinoa, organic dairy, beans, legumes, that kind of stuff, all right? Number two is reduce sugar. So too much insulin can
suppress your thyroid, so it’s really important to avoid those refined carbohydrates and the sugar and always try and eat
protein and healthy fats with your food so that you can slow down any sugar release from any carbs. Number three is to get your nutrients in. Now, I talked about the nutrients needed for thyroid hormones to
actually be created and produced but also to be converted. So we want vitamin D from
the sun or supplements, especially now during the winter, we need vitamin D supplements,
all of us in the UK. So make sure you’re
supplementing vitamin D3. Vitamin A from grass-fed
butter animal products, really important. Iron, again from animal
products and legumes and seeds and whole grains. Selenium, some nuts, brazil nuts, two or three brazil nuts will give you your day’s quantity of selenium. Zinc, iodine, tyrosine,
I mentioned from protein. Omega-3 fat’s incredibly important and all of your B vitamins,
really really important. So you need a really wide
range of vitamins and minerals. And I would get yourself
tested if you’re thinking you may be deficient in some of those because it’s really really important to make sure you’re not. Fourth natural solution is to avoid those food sensitivities. So common ones, the most
common are gluten and dairy. Gluten in particular, as I said, it’s been linked with Hashimoto’s. So we want to make sure
that we’re avoiding gluten if you’ve got that diagnosed. Number five is, include
coconut oil in your diet. Now, it is a saturated fat, but it’s made of medium
chain triglycerides, MCTs. You can also get MCT oil if
you don’t like coconut oil, pop it in your smoothies. It really helps to boost metabolism and helps thyroid to do its job. Number six is support your gut. So any imbalance in your
gut flora or any infections can really interfere with
your thyroid function and really stimulate
that autoimmune response because your immune
system lives in your gut. So we want to be supporting the gut with lots of probiotics
and prebiotics foods such a live yogurts and
garlic and onions and leaks, and fermented sauerkrauts,
things like that. Kefir and kombucha are
now widely available in the supermarkets so get
some of those into your diet. And if you suspect, or
you have other gut issues, then get yourself tested properly and talk to me about that if you want to. We have an amazing gut test, stool test, that picks up any kind
of microbial imbalance. So we wanna make sure we haven’t got those and we’re ruling that out. Number seven, where am I? Seven is to check your
environmental exposure. So really minimize your exposure to those endocrine disrupting chemicals by drinking filtered water, avoiding plastics as much as possible, eating organic, and then
swapping those household and personal products to
more non-toxic brands, check out my other blogs on those. Number eight, whoop, where am I? (laughs) Look after your adrenals so that’s stress, I mean stress comes into
every single video I do and write about in the blogs
because it’s so important, it has an impact on everything. So just make sure you’re
getting that me time every day, that relax time, that down time. And supplement with vitamin
C, magnesium, and B vitamins to make sure that you’re
not deficient in those because when we’re stressed
we use those up very quickly. And last one, exercise. Activity increases your metabolism, it helps to maintain that muscle mass, it helps to get nutrients into your cells and your hormones and
helps to eliminate toxins. So walking is great if you
haven’t got much energy. Yoga ticks all the boxes for me. And you know, yoga, those
inversion shoulder stands, they are meant to
stimulate thyroid, I think. I don’t know, I don’t
have the evidence of that, but hey, it’s part of
yoga so that’s good to me. If you do suspect you
have a thyroid issue, it’s really important to get
help, you can’t leave it. Not only because it makes
you feel rubbish but also, it increases your risk of stuff later on, so we want to make sure that your thyroid is working properly. So contact me for a discovery call and we’ll get that booked in and I can chat to you about your thyroid or click on one of the links below and have a look at some of
the other blogs I’ve done. Okay, hope that was helpful. Take care, bye.

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